News

Tuesday, 26 March 2013
After a recent visit to Duke University, The Fayetteville Observer (a daily newspaper published in Fayetteville, North Carolina) published an article discussing federaly-funded programs within the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University. The article also mentions UNC Chapel Hill and Fayetteville State University. The Fayetteville Observer is the oldest continuously published newspaper in North Carolina, founded in 1816 and claims to be the largest independent newspaper in the state. N.C...
Thursday, 14 March 2013
In a recent article by Gail Overton of Laser Focus World, the computational imager from Duke Scientists published in Science "Metamaterial Apertures for Computational Imaging" is discussed: By Gail OvertonSenior Editor "Although it currently operates in the microwave region, a metamaterial-based computational imager from scientists at Duke University (Durham, NC) and the University of California–San Diego (UCSD; La Jolla, CA) could be engineered to operate at infrared (IR) and other photonic...
Friday, 8 March 2013
"Using a discrete dipole approximation to predict complete scattering of complicated metamaterials," published 2012 in New Journal of Physics (NJP) has been selected by the editors of NJP as a part of the exclusive 'Highlights of 2012' collection. The articles featured span some of the most cutting-edge areas of physics, and collectively are a reflection of the most influential research published in NJP in 2012. Articles were chosen on the basis of referee endorsement, impact and broad appeal...
Monday, 25 February 2013
Center Director and current Duke Professor, David R. Smith will speak at the University of California San Diego on Wednesday, February 27th for a free public lecture regarding the invisibility cloak. A preview interview with Gary Robbins of the San Diego Union is transcribed below, or click here:   Interview "Q: Many people think of Harry Potter’s fictional invisibility cloak when the subject of invisibility comes up. Is this the kind of thing you’re working on? A: Harry Potter’s magical cloak...
Monday, 25 February 2013
Kymeta is a company that was recently launched out of Redmond, Washington, developing relatively small antennas that replace satellite dishes so planes and trains can get better broadband service. For a write up from Forbes magazine on Kymeta, click here. Kymeta is a spin-off company from Intellectual Ventures in Bellevue, WA, based on Duke University's technology developed by David Smith, and former postod Dr. Nathan Kundtz the current CTO of Kymeta.  As a young company, it comes as quite an...
Monday, 21 January 2013
Professor David R. Smith, Director of the Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics at Duke University, has announced that he will serve as Acting Director of the Metamaterials Commercialization Group at Intellectual Ventures (IV) in Bellevue, Washington, effective January 1, 2013. Dr. Smith will be responsible for the further development of technical resources and capabilities at IV that will enable and accelerate the transition of metamaterials-based products from the laboratory to...
Friday, 18 January 2013
In a podcast with Science Magazine reporter Kerry Klein asks John Hunt to describe the  innovative imaging tool for taking higher-efficiency microwave images described in   "Metamaterial Apertures for Computational Imaging" A full transcript of the podcast can be found below or by clicking here. Play Sound Host – Kerry Klein Welcome to the Science Podcast for January 18th , 2013. I’m Kerry Klein [....] Host – Kerry Klein "In a digital camera, more megapixels means better resolutio—the ability...
Friday, 18 January 2013
John Markoff of the New York Times recently spoke with ECE Graduate Student John Hunt and Professor David Smith on their Science Magazine publication "Metamaterial Apertures for Computational Imaging". His Full story "Scientists Develop Device for Image Compression" can be found here; or below; "Using a new class of artificial materials, scientists at Duke University have designed a sensor that compresses images far more efficiently than existing technologies like JPEG. The materials, called...
Friday, 18 January 2013
by Richard Merritt DURHAM, N.C. – Duke University engineers have developed a novel “sensor” that is more efficient, versatile, and cheaper for potential use in such applicationsas airport security scanners, and collision avoidance systems for aircraft cars or maritime vessels. The researchers fabricated a unique material, known as a metamaterial, that acts as a “lens” to image scenes using fewer components than conventional detectors. Because of the properties of this man-made material, much of...
Thursday, 17 January 2013
Prachi Patle of the IEEE Spectrum, inside technology reported on Graduate Student John Hunt's Science publication titled, "Metamaterial apertures for computational imaging." The full IEEE article can be found below or by clicking "Metamaterials Could Slim Down Millieter-Wave Imagers." Simpler scanners with no moving parts could lead to portable weapons detectors Millimeter-wave scanners are able to reveal hidden guns and knives on a person’s body because that wavelength of light passes through...
Thursday, 17 January 2013
In the recently published "Metamaterial Apertures for Computational Imaging" Duke University researchers discovered by leveraging metamaterials and compressive imaging, a low-profile aperture capable of microwave imaging without lenses, moving parts, or phase shifters can be demonstrated. Their discovery is discussed further with Nadia Drake from WIRED below. By Nadia DrakeWIRED "A small, microwave-detecting camera that can see through solid materials in real time has been developed. Soon, the...
Wednesday, 16 January 2013
Senior Editor Gail Overton from Laser Focus World discussed with researchers at Duke Univerity in the David Smith group the revelations from Nature's "Controlled-reflectance surfaces with film coupled colloidal nanoantennas". Her full feature can be found here, and mentioned below; NANOPHOTONIC METAMATERIALS: Nanocubes create tunable metamaterial absorber Released: 01/15/2013By Gail Overton "Metallic, metamaterial-based light absorbers used as photovoltaic and detection devices are easily tuned...
Friday, 4 January 2013
Daniel Knighton, journalist for BreakThru Radio (BTR) discussed the scientific accomplishments of 2012 and featured Duke University's research on the Invisibility cloak. Breakthruradio.com has been providing the world with the best in music related content since 2005. Included below is an excerpt from the full article: Saran Wrap of Invisibility "Researchers at Duke University have crafted the impossible: a prototype for the real world's very own "invisibility cloak." The current design,...
Friday, 7 December 2012
Director David R. Smith recently interviewed with Frank Grotelüschen of dradio.de. The interview focuses on Smiths' recent Nature publication and nanocubes in respect to lightbulbs. The full text is translated from German to English below. "Silver than light swallowers New nano-technology create perfect absorber By Frank Grotelüschen Technik. - Because of their lousy energy efficiency the EU Commission has declared the lightbulb looking redundant, because of their pleasant light are the...
Thursday, 6 December 2012
Richard Merritt of the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University recently released "Silver Nanocubes Super Light Absorbers" and  the application of Research Scientist Cristian Ciraci and Faculty, David R. Smith. You can read the full article below; POST DATE: 2012-12-06 "DURHAM, N.C. – Microscopic metallic cubes could unleash the enormous potential of metamaterials to absorb light, leading to more efficient and cost-effective large-area absorbers for sensor applications or energy-...

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